Garlic Rust

Rust (Puccinia allii) is a fungal disease that attacks garlic, onions, chives, shallots and other alliums. Infestation becomes apparent in mid to late spring when weather is moist and warm. Yellowish orange flecks soon turn to bright orange pustules on the undersides of leaves. Rust is debilitating to the plant and can result in smaller, inferior garlic bulbs, so it’s important to deal with rust before it can take hold and spread. Prevention is the best method.

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May

The eight basic warm-season vegetables should go in later in May or even early June when the weather is (hopefully) reliably warm: beans, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, melons, peppers, squash, and tomatoes.  Buy plants for eggplants, tomatoes and peppers, but you can still grow the rest from seeds.

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Spring Forward

I know some people hate the semi-annual time change – spring forward, fall back – but the longer hours in the early evenings have given me lots of time to work in my new gardens. And even if you are feeling a little sleep deprived, there’s nothing like some time spent in a garden to revive you.

March is the month to plan, plant and start seeds indoors. So get out your seed packages, find those gardening gloves, pick up a trowel, and let’s get gardening!

Elizabeth Cull, Franchise President

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Garden Inspiration

This looks like a real balcony where anyone would love to hang out on a fine summer day. But it’s actually one of the demonstration gardens at the Northwest Flower & Garden Show in Seattle held every February. Now that I’m gardening on a small deck, you can be sure I took lots of photos to inspire me.

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April

April is the month gardener’s wait for – this is the month you can really get planting in earnest. Click on “April” to get the full to-do list for this month.

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And Another Gardening Season Begins

The tips of spring-flowering bulbs poking through the soil in my planters tell me that another gardening season is about to begin. And while it’s really too soon to start any seeds – even indoors – this is the perfect time to make sure you have everything you’ll need when the days get longer and the weather gradually warms up.

The first thing to do is take stock of your garden and supplies. Take a good look at your garden and think back to last season. If you made notes, took pictures or kept a journal – great! You know what you want to repeat and what you want to change. If you grow vegetables, take some time to consider how you will rotate your crops to avoid pests and disease. Draw a plan or make a list of what you want to add or delete so you’re ready and don’t fall in love with the first lovely plant or seed you see only to find out if really won’t work.

And check out our latest newsletter. It’s all about starting plants from seeds.

Elizabeth Cull, Franchise President

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Good Soil: The Real Dirt

No matter what you grow, vegetables or flowers, in a spacious garden or a pot on a balcony, the first thing you need is good soil. It took me years to understand this, and now “Soil First” is my gardening mantra.

To read more about improving your garden soil, click on the picture above.

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January

It’s a new year, and soon we’ll be into the thick of gardening again! Click on the word “January” above for some tips on what to do to get ready for the coming season.

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December

Be prepared for cold weather.  Bring tender plants inside or put them under cover in a frost-free greenhouse, a conservatory, a porch, or anywhere where the plants can continue to get light, but avoid the frost and harshest of the winter weather. Click on December above to read more.

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